Application of isotopes in carbon dating


15-Mar-2019 23:45

The radiation emitted by some radioactive substances can be used to kill microorganisms on a variety of foodstuffs, extending the shelf life of these products.

Produce such as tomatoes, mushrooms, sprouts, and berries are irradiated with the emissions from cobalt-60 or cesium-137.

Technetium-99 can also be used to test thyroid function.

Bones, the heart, the brain, the liver, the lungs, and many other organs can be imaged in similar ways by using the appropriate radioactive isotope.

This exposure kills a lot of the bacteria that cause spoilage, so the produce stays fresh longer.

Eggs and some meat, such as beef, pork, and poultry, can also be irradiated.

(The half-life of carbon-14 is 5,370 y.) If a once-living artifact is discovered and analyzed many years after its death and the remaining carbon-14 is compared to the known constant level, an approximate age of the artifact can be determined.

After incorporating radioactive atoms into reactant molecules, scientists can track where the atoms go by following their radioactivity.

One excellent example of this is the use of carbon-14 to determine the steps involved in photosynthesis in plants.

Shroud of Turin In 1989, several groups of scientists used carbon-14 dating to demonstrate that the Shroud of Turin was only 600–700 y.

Many people still cling to a different notion, despite the scientific evidence.Contrary to the belief of some people, irradiation of food Radioactive isotopes have numerous medical applications—diagnosing and treating illness and diseases.